Guillain Barre Syndrome




WHO- It affects 1 to 2 people out of 100,000. A good number of people who get Guillain-Barre syndrome get better. Half of all cases the syndrome trails after a viral or bacterial infection. The male-to-female ratio is 1.5:1. A Swedish epidemiologic study showed that the incidence of GBS is lower during pregnancy and increases following delivery. GBS occurs at all ages, but a bimodal distribution with peaks in young adulthood and in elderly persons appears to exist. Rare cases have been noted in infants.
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WHAT- The first symptoms of GBS are usually numbness or tingling in the toes and fingers. Also a weakness in the arms and legs over the next few days will occur. Some patients experience paresthesia in their toes and legs, others experience symptoms on only one side of the body. The symptoms may amplify in intensity until the patient is nearly totally paralyzed. In these cases, the disorder is life-threatening and is a medical emergency.

WHERE- The nerves outside the brain and spinal cord are called the peripheral nerves. The peripheral nerves broadcast signals from ones brain to ones muscles telling him or her to move. They can also transmit sensory signals from our muscles to our brain. When GBS causes these nerves to be temporarily damaged, the signals are interrupted. As a result they will be weak or have problems moving. They may aslo feel numbness and tingling in the arms and/or legs.
HOW- No one knows what causes GBS or why it affects some people and not others. Guillain-Barre syndrome is called a syndrome because doctors diagnose it based on a collection of symptoms.
WHEN- Guillain-Barre syndrome has been connected with antecedent bacterial and viral infections, vaccinations, and other illnesses. Case reports are present concerning many medications and procedures, but whether any fundamental link exists is unclear. When GBS does strike it can progress quickly with the most severe symptoms taking place as soon as 2 weeks after the first signs appear.





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Guillian Barre Syndrom DougH11 DougH11 0 34 May 15, 2009 by DougH11 DougH11









www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/gbs/gbs.htm

http://www.ohiohealth.com/mayo/images/image_popup/r7_myelinsheath.jpg
www.neurologychannel.com/guillain/index.shtml
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emedicine.medscape.com/article/792008-overview
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kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/bones/gbs.html